General works, Computer science and Information

Institute Library Classification System

"The Institute Library’s classification system is unique. It was created by our first professional librarian, William A. Borden, who served as librarian between 1897- and 1903-1910. After the establishment of the New Haven Free Public Library in 1887, the Institute Library began to withdraw from the public life of the city and focus primarily on expanding and circulating its collection of general-interest and popular literature. The librarian during this period, William A.

Yale Library Classification

"The beginning of the subject-classification system - books arranged by subject according to a classification schedule - is dated, rather too precisely, as 1890, because in that year the second library building (Chittenden Hall) was opened. The first library building, originally containing about 20,000 volumes, had reached its capacity of some 200,000 volumes in less than fifty years. The necessity of expanding into a second building made the year 1890 a natural time for making a radical change, which had undoubtedly been contemplated for several years.

Widener System

"Note that Widener uses two separate classification systems to shelve books: the Old Widener System and the Library of Congress System indicated by call numbers that begin with WID-LC. (...) In the Old Widener System, call numbers contain whole numbers and are separated by periods that do not confer a decimal value. (...) In Library of Congress WID-LC Classes, call numbers are separated by periods that do confer a decimal value."

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