classification scheme

Yale Library Classification

"The beginning of the subject-classification system - books arranged by subject according to a classification schedule - is dated, rather too precisely, as 1890, because in that year the second library building (Chittenden Hall) was opened. The first library building, originally containing about 20,000 volumes, had reached its capacity of some 200,000 volumes in less than fifty years. The necessity of expanding into a second building made the year 1890 a natural time for making a radical change, which had undoubtedly been contemplated for several years.

Widener System

"Note that Widener uses two separate classification systems to shelve books: the Old Widener System and the Library of Congress System indicated by call numbers that begin with WID-LC. (...) In the Old Widener System, call numbers contain whole numbers and are separated by periods that do not confer a decimal value. (...) In Library of Congress WID-LC Classes, call numbers are separated by periods that do confer a decimal value."

Music Vocabulary

"音楽作品、楽器、演奏情報を記述するためのボキャブラリ。Opera_Event(演奏)とOpera(作品)や、String_Quartette(作品)とStringQuartetEnsemble(団体)のように、日常語では両方の意味に使われるクラスの区別に注意。このバージョンでは、音楽作品、その表現(演奏、楽譜など)とイベント(演奏会)をより精密にモデリングするべく実験中。"

"A vocabulary, or music ontology, to describe classical music and performances. Classes (categories) for musical works, events, instruments and performers, as well as related properties are defined. Make sure to distinguish musical works (e.g. Opera) from performance events (Opera_Event), or works (String_Quartette) from performer (StringQuartetEnsemble in this vocab), whose natural language terms are used interchangeblly.

Harvard Spectral Classification Scheme

"The modern stellar spectral classification scheme (also known as the Harvard Spectral Classification Scheme) was created by Annie Jump Cannon through her examination of spectra from 1918 to 1924. Originally, the scheme used capital letters running alphabetically, but was later reordered to reflect the surface temperatures of stars. In order of decreasing temperature, these types were O, B, A, F, G, K and M. Three additional categories also in the scheme: R, N, and S types, were later realized to represent stars with peculiar heavy-metal abundances.

Coastal and Marine Ecological Classification Standard

"The Coastal and Marine Ecological Classification Standard (CMECS) provides a national framework for organizing information about coasts and oceans and their living systems. It provides a structure for developing and synthesizing data so that ecosystems can be identified, characterized, and mapped in a standard way across regional and national boundaries. CMECS also supports status and trend monitoring activities, policy development, restoration planning, and fisheries management. The standard complements existing wetland and upland classification systems.

Eating and Drinking Ability Classification System for Individuals with Cerebral Palsy

"We have developed a new Eating and Drinking Ability Classification System (EDACS) for people with cerebral palsy. EDACS describes five distinct levels of ability using the key features of safety and efficiency (...). Our new Eating and Drinking Ability Classification System (EDACS) offers an alternative to subjective terms such as mild and moderate and severe which have no agreed definition. We developed EDACS by consulting with people with cerebral palsy, parents and experts around the world.

London Library Classification Scheme

"The London Library has a unique and rather unorthodox classification scheme. Described as 'unusual but serviceable' by Alan Bell (Librarian of the London Library from 1993 to 2001), its application and maintenance are both a joy and a challenge. The scheme was devised by Sir Charles Theodore Hagberg Wright (1862-1940), Librarian of the London Library from 1893 until his death. (...): it was created on the principle of literary warrant, that is, it was designed around the books the Library held at the time.

Classification of Musical Instruments

"The MIMO (Musical Instrument Museums Online) project has created a single access point to digital content and information on the collections of musical instruments held in a consortium of European museums. (...) The MIMO project has also involved the revision of the Hornbostel Sachs classification of musical instruments, with the main aim of classifying instruments such those in the new Electrophones class 5, invented since the publication of the original scheme of 1914 by Erich M. von Hornbostel and Curt Sachs. A number of scholars have at various times revised or extended the scheme.

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