philosophy

Taxonomy of the Logical Fallacies

"The Fallacy Files Taxonomy is a tree-like structure that classifies all of the fallacies in these files by the sub-fallacy relation. A sub-fallacy, which is a specific version of a more general fallacy, has whatever features the more general fallacy has, together with specific features which set it apart and make it worth naming in its own right. For example, instead of grouping together 'fallacies of relevance', there is one most general such fallacy—namely, Red Herring—and all fallacies of relevance are sub-fallacies of it.

Ελληνο-Αγγλικό Γλωσσάριο Φιλοσοφικών Όρων

"This collection of glossaries is intended to assist two groups of people: 1) speakers of Modern Greek who need to read and translate works of philosophy written in English or to write philosophical works in English, and 2) speakers of English who need to to read and translate works of philosophy written in Modern Greek or to write philosophical works in Modern Greek. It gives standard and otherwise acceptable translations of over 2000 philosophical terms, but not their meanings.

The Vagueness Ontology

"Vagueness is a common human knowledge and language phenomenon, typically manifested by terms and concepts like High, Expert, Bad, Near, etc. It is a phenomenon related to our inability to precisely determine the extensions of such concepts in certain domains and contexts. That is because vague concepts have typically blurred boundaries which do not allow for a sharp distinction between the entities that fall within their extension and those that do no. For example, some people are borderline tall: not clearly 'tall' and not clearly 'not tall'.

Library of Avalon Classification System

"The Library's classification system is unique, having been devised specifically for its purpose by the Founders (who based it upon the Bliss system), and formally copyrighted in 1990. It provides far more subcategories than would the Dewey decimal classification system. It is entirely alphabetical, the first two letters being the category code, the remaining three being the first three letters of the author's surname (with precedence rules for such names as macDonald, tenEyck or duMaurier).

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