Vancouver

Out On The Shelves Classification System

This project, undertaken during the summer of 2018 intended to build a system that is reflective of the mission and values of the Out On The Shelves Library, namely to "foster a free, accessible, and safe space for LGBTQ2IA+ people and their allies to discover and share stories and resources centering on LGBTQ2IA+ experiences" (About: Out On The Shelves) To this end, goals for the new system – approved by the volunteer team at Out On The Shelves Library during the planning process – include updated language, logical order and arrangement to enhance the browsing experience, as well as ensuri

Brian Deer Classification Scheme

"Xwi7xwa Library uses a modified version of the Brian Deer classification system, developed by Kahnawake librarian Brian Deer for the National Indian Brotherhood (now the Assembly of First Nations) in the 1970s. Xwi7xwa Library employs a modified version of the classification scheme in order to better reflect the library's unique collection and clientele."

Ontology for Biomedical Investigations

"The Ontology for Biomedical Investigations (OBI) project is developing an integrated ontology for the description of biological and clinical investigations. This includes a set of 'universal' terms, that are applicable across various biological and technological domains, and domain-specific terms relevant only to a given domain. This ontology will support the consistent annotation of biomedical investigations, regardless of the particular field of study.

Kinetic Simulation Algorithm Ontology

"To enable the accurate and repeatable execution of a computational simulation task, it is important to identify both the algorithm used and the initial setup. These minimum information requirements are described by the MIASE guidelines. Since the details of some algorithms are not always publicly available, and many are implemented only in a limited number of simulation tools, it is crucial to identify alternative algorithms with similar characteristics that may be used to provide comparable results in an equivalent simulation experiment.