North Carolina

State Publications Classification

"When the Documents Section of the North Carolina State Library was organized between 1957-1960, this classification scheme was devised by the documents librarian, Sangster Parrott, for the Library's large collection of North Carolina public documents. Documents are arranged by state government agency and then by function. The scheme is partially adapted from the U.S. Superintendent of Documents Classification System which is used for Federal documents collections.

IUPAC Quantities, Units and Symbols in Physical Chemistry

"The purpose of this manual is to improve the exchange of scientific information among the readers in different disciplines and across different nations. As the volume of scientific literature expands, each discipline has a tendency to retreat into its own jargon. This book attempts to provide a readable compilation of widely used terms and symbols from many sources together with brief understandable definitions. This Third Edition reflects the experience of the contributors with the previous editions and we are grateful for the many thoughtful comments we have received.

IUPAC Compendium of Analytical Nomenclature

"The index of this edition contains ca 6,000 entries. The cross-references may help the readers to find the correct terms which they are looking for. (...) It is expected that the readers who are interested in IUPAC recommendations concerning analytical terms and definitions will be able to find them quickly and easily in the Compendium. In the text of the Compendium there are, occasionally, contradicting definitions which result from the fact that the experts of different fields - while trying to do their best-hold different views on certain key issues.

IUPAC Compendium of Polymer Terminology and Nomenclature

"The IUPAC system of polymer nomenclature has aided the generation of unambiguous names that reflect the historical development of chemistry. However, the explosion in the circulation of information and the globalization of human activities mean that it is now necessary to have a common language for use in legal situations, patents, export-import regulations, and environmental health and safety information.

IUPAC Nomenclature of Organic Chemistry

"Chemical nomenclature is used to identify a chemical species by means of written or spoken words and enables a common language for communication amongst chemists. Nomenclature for chemical compounds additionally contains an explicit or implied relationship to the structure of the compound, in order that the reader or listener can deduce the structure from the name. This purpose requires a system of principles and rules, the application of which gives rise to a systematic nomenclature.

IUPAC Nomenclature of Inorganic Chemistry

"The Rules of Inorganic Nomenclature (the 'Red Book'), first published in 1958 by the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC), were most recently updated as Nomenclature of Inorganic Chemistry 1990. This new 2005 edition of the 'Red Book' clarifies and updates recommendations concerning the names and formulae of inorganic compounds and reflects major recent developments in inorganic chemistry. Moreover, it presents recommendations fully consistent with the principles of the nomenclature of organic chemistry.

IUPAC Compendium of Chemical Terminology

"The Compendium is popularly referred to as the 'Gold Book', in recognition of the contribution of the late Victor Gold, who initiated work on the first edition. It is one of the series of IUPAC 'Colour Books' on chemical nomenclature, terminology, symbols and units (see the list of source documents), and collects together terminology definitions from IUPAC recommendations already published in Pure and Applied Chemistry and in the other Colour Books.

Comparative Data Analysis Ontology

"CDAO stands for "Comparative Data Analysis Ontology", a formalization of concepts and relations relevant to evolutionary comparative analysis, such as phylogenetic trees, OTUs (operational taxonomic units) and compared characters (including molecular characters as well as other types). CDAO is being developed by scientists in biology, evolution, and computer science. In general, ontologies are designed to support formal or automated reasoning. Our aim in developing CDAO is to provide the language support for representing, and reasoning over, phylogenetic data and metadata.

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