OWL

Comparative Data Analysis Ontology

"CDAO stands for "Comparative Data Analysis Ontology", a formalization of concepts and relations relevant to evolutionary comparative analysis, such as phylogenetic trees, OTUs (operational taxonomic units) and compared characters (including molecular characters as well as other types). CDAO is being developed by scientists in biology, evolution, and computer science. In general, ontologies are designed to support formal or automated reasoning. Our aim in developing CDAO is to provide the language support for representing, and reasoning over, phylogenetic data and metadata.

Environment Ontology

"The Environment Ontology (EnvO) provides a controlled, structured vocabulary that is designed to support the annotation of any organism or biological sample with environment descriptors. EnvO contains terms for biomes, environmental features, and environmental material." EnvO enables "a concise, standardised, and comprehensive description of environment that is key to the integration, archiving and federated searching of environmental data. As a tool for the life sciences, we see EnvO bringing benefits similar to those of the Gene Ontology (GO).

Emotion Ontology

"The Swiss Centre for Affective Sciences, in collaboration with the University at Buffalo, is developing an Emotion Ontology to describe affective phenomena. This project is a branch of the broader Mental Functioning ontology effort. The Centre brings together scientists from neuroscience and psychology, together with economists, historians, philosophers as well as scholars in the humanities, in a multi-disciplinary effort to understand how affective phenomena, such as motives, attitudes, moods, and emotions, affect the individual and society.

Chemical Entities of Biological Interest

"Chemical Entities of Biological Interest (ChEBI) is a freely available dictionary of molecular entities focused on ‘small’ chemical compounds. The term ‘molecular entity’ refers to any constitutionally or isotopically distinct atom, molecule, ion, ion pair, radical, radical ion, complex, conformer, etc., identifiable as a separately distinguishable entity. The molecular entities in question are either products of nature or synthetic products used to intervene in the processes of living organisms.

Ontology for Genetic Interval

"Using realistic ontology BFO as its top ontology's framwork, OGI formalized the genomic element by defining an upper class 'genetic interval'. The definition of 'genetic interval' is "the spatial continuous physical entity which contains ordered genomic sets(DNA, RNA, Allele, Marker,etc.) between and including two points (Nucleic Acid Base Residue) that have a liner primary sequence sturcture. It is either a proper part of an chromosome or a RNA molecule or an artificial genetic interval."

Ontology of Data Mining

"The domain of data mining (DM) deals with analyzing different types of data. The data typically used in data mining is in the format of a single table, with primitive datatypes as attributes. However, structured (complex) data, such as graphs, sequences, networks, text, image, multimedia and relational data, are receiving an increasing amount of interest in data mining. A major challenge is to treat and represent the mining of different types of structured data in a uniform fashion.

Ontology for General Medical Science

"The Ontology for General Medical Science (OGMS) is an ontology of entities involved in a clinical encounter. OGMS includes very general terms that are used across medical disciplines, including: 'disease', 'disorder', 'disease course', 'diagnosis', 'patient', and 'healthcare provider'. OGMS uses the Basic Formal Ontology (BFO) as an upper-level ontology. The scope of OGMS is restricted to humans, but many terms can be applied to a variety of organisms. OGMS provides a formal theory of disease that can be further elaborated by specific disease ontologies.

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