OWL

The Design Intent Ontology

"The Design Intent Ontology (DIO) is a generic ontology that provides the conceptualisation needed to capture the knowledge generated during various phases of the overall design lifecycle. It provides definitions for design artifacts such as requirements, designs, design issues, solutions, justifications and evidence and relationships between them to represent the design process and how these things lead to design outcomes. It draws upon the paradigms of IBIS(Issue Based Information System), argumentation and design rationale.

ECLAP, Performing Arts Vocabulary

"The ECLAP vocabulary provide classes and properties for the description of multimedia content related with performing arts. It includes classes for the description of the kind of media used (Video, Audio, Document, etc.), classes for the description of annotations on media (One2One, Explosive), it includes properties for people involved in the creation process as performing arts professionals like (director, actor, mime, clown, etc.), and it includes properties relating the Users with content, groups and annotations (...)."

Extensible Observation Ontology

"The Extensible Observation Ontology (OBOE) is a formal ontology for capturing the semantics of scientific observation and measurement. The ontology supports researchers to add detailed semantic annotations to scientific data, thereby clarifying the inherent meaning of scientific observations. (...) OBOE can characterize the context of an observation (e.g., space and time), as well as dependencies such as nested experimental observations.

Biological Collections Ontology

"The Biological Collections Ontology (BCO) is an application ontology developed as part of the Biocode Commons project, within the OBO Foundry framework. The goal of the BCO is to support the interoperability of biodiversity data, including data on museum collections, environmental/metagenomic samples, and ecological surveys. The BCO covers distinctions between individuals, organisms, voucher specimens, lots, samples, the relations between these entities, and the processes governing the creation and use of 'samples'.

Human Phenotype Ontology

"The Human Phenotype Ontology (HPO) aims to provide a standardized vocabulary of phenotypic abnormalities encountered in human disease. Each term in the HPO describes a phenotypic abnormality, such as atrial septal defect. The HPO is currently being developed using the medical literature, Orphanet, DECIPHER, and OMIM. HPO currently contains approximately 11,000 terms and over 115,000 annotations to hereditary diseases. The HPO also provides a large set of HPO annotations to approximately 4000 common diseases.

TOVE Organization Ontology

"Based on: Fox, M.S., Barbuceanu, M., Gruninger, M., and Lin, J., (1998), 'An Organisation Ontology for Enterprise Modeling', In Simulating Organizations: Computational Models of Institutions and Groups, M. Prietula, K. Carley & L. Gasser (Eds), Menlo Park CA: AAAI/MIT Press, pp. 131-152. http://www.eil.utoronto.ca/enterprise-modelling/papers/org-prietula-23au..."

International Contact Ontology

"This ontology provides basic classes and more detailed properties for representating international street addresses, phone numbers and emails. Rather than using existing ontologies, such as vcard, it was decided to create a new one as the vcard and foaf ignore the details of international addresses, phone numbers, etc. The important part of the ontology are the object and data properties used to describe addresses primarily and phone numbers."

Global City Indicator Foundation Ontology

"Contains the foundation ontologies required to represent ISO 37120 city indicators, including Placenames, Time, Measurement, Provenance, Statistics, Validity and Trust. See: Fox, M.S., (2013), 'A Foundation Ontology for Global City Indicators', Global City Institute Working Paper, Vol. 1, No.4, pp. 1-45. Global Cities Institute, University of Toronto.

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