soil science

Unified Soil Classification System

"The Unified Soil Classification System (USCS) is a soil classification system used in engineering and geology to describe the texture and grain size of a soil. The classification system can be applied to most unconsolidated materials, and is represented by a two-letter symbol."

Thesaurus of Rock and Soil Mechanics Terms

"The thesaurus was originally compiled by J P Jenkins of the Rock Mechanics Information Service in 1976-1977. Since then it has been used and developed primarily for internal use. With the public availability of the Geomechanics Abstracts data base (GMA) on the Pergamon-InfoLine on-line system, the thesaurus is being published as an aid to users of GMA. The thesaurus derives in style principally from the Thesaurus of Engineering and Scientific Terms.

Klassifikation der Böden der Schweiz

"Die Bodenklassifikation hat zum Ziel, Böden aufgrund ihrer vielfältigen Profil- und Standortmerkmale systematisch zu klassieren. Damit ist es möglich, untersuchte Böden zu identifizieren, zu vergleichen, zu unterscheiden und zu beurteilen. Die Klassifikation hat ihre Bedeutung vor allem innerhalb der Bodenkunde selbst, denn pedologische Forschungen und Versuche sollten stets an gut definierten und klassierten Böden erfolgen, damit Resultate vergleichbar sind. Wichtig ist die Bodenklassifikation ferner bei vielen interdisziplinären Forschungen sowie in der Lehre."

"The classification of the soil has the objective of systematically classifying soils due to their diverse profile and location characteristics, making it possible to identify, compare, distinguish and assess subsoil soils.The classification has its importance mainly within the soil customer himself, Since pedological research and experiments should always be carried out on well-defined and classified soils, so that results can be compared. The classification of soil is also important in many interdisciplinary researches as well as in teaching. "

New Zealand Soil Classification

"The New Zealand Soil Classification was developed in the 1980s. The top three levels of the classification ( orders, groups, and subgroups) were described by Hewitt (1993) and the fourth level (soilforms) by Clayden and Webb (1994). The new classification grew out of the N ew Zealand Genetic Soil Classification and, where possible, preserved its useful features. The new classification was also influenced by local experience in testing the United States soil classification system "Soil Taxonomy" (Soil Survey Staff 1975, 1996; Leamy et al. 1983).

"The New Zealand Soil Classification was developed in the 1980s. The top three levels of the classification ( orders, groups, and subgroups) were described by Hewitt (1993) and the fourth level (soilforms) by Clayden and Webb (1994). The new classification grew out of the N ew Zealand Genetic Soil Classification and, where possible, preserved its useful features. The new classification was also influenced by local experience in testing the United States soil classification system "Soil Taxonomy" (Soil Survey Staff 1975, 1996; Leamy et al. 1983).

Australian Soil Classification

"Welcome to the Revised Edition of the Australian Soil Classification. The information provided here is intended as an on-line facility for all interested parties to assist with soil classification work. It is recommended, however, if any extended work is to be undertaken, that obtaining the book would be beneficial as it is convenient to use in the field where most soil description and classification takes place."

"Welcome to the Revised Edition of the Australian Soil Classification. The information provided here is intended as an on-line facility for all interested parties to assist with soil classification work. It is recommended, however, if any extended work is to be undertaken, that obtaining the book would be beneficial as it is convenient to use in the field where most soil description and classification takes place."

Soil Taxonomy

"The publication Keys to Soil Taxonomy serves two purposes. It provides the taxonomic keys necessary for the classification of soils in a form that can be used easily in the field. It also acquaints users of the taxonomic system with recent changes in the system. The eleventh edition of the Keys to Soil Taxonomy incorporates all changes approved since the publication of the second edition of Soil Taxonomy: A Basic System of Soil Classification for Making and Interpreting Soil Surveys (1999).

"The publication Keys to Soil Taxonomy serves two purposes. It provides the taxonomic keys necessary for the classification of soils in a form that can be used easily in the field. It also acquaints users of the taxonomic system with recent changes in the system. The eleventh edition of the Keys to Soil Taxonomy incorporates all changes approved since the publication of the second edition of Soil Taxonomy: A Basic System of Soil Classification for Making and Interpreting Soil Surveys (1999).