data processing

e-Science Thesaurus

"The e-Science Thesaurus is a resource that supports and provides direction to the health sciences and science and technology library community by exploring the terminology, literature, and resources that describe and inform librarians about patron instruction, collection development, and research services related to e-Science and research data management principles and practice. The Thesaurus strives to describe the concepts, services, tools and resources required to create, curate, preserve and disseminate digital scholarship.

Vocabulary of Interlinked Datasets

"The Vocabulary of Interlinked Datasets (VoID) is an RDF Schema vocabulary for expressing metadata about RDF datasets. It is intended as a bridge between the publishers and users of RDF data, with applications ranging from data discovery to cataloging and archiving of datasets. This document provides a formal definition of the new RDF classes and properties introduced for VoID."

COGS

"The growing availability of data on the Web provided by Web 2.0 applications and, more recently through Linked Data, brought the computational pattern expressed as ETL to reemerge in a scenario with additional complexity, where the number of data sources and the data heterogeneity that needs to be supported by ETL drastically increases. In this scenario, issues with data quality and trustworthiness may strongly impact the data utility for end-users.

Open Science Taxonomy

"The FOSTER portal is an e-learning platform that brings together the best training resources for those who need to know more about Open Science, or who need to develop strategies and skills for implementing Open Science practices in their daily workflows. Here you will find a growing collection of training materials to meet the needs of many different users, from early-career researchers, to data managers, librarians, funders, and graduate schools." Click on "View the taxonomy tree".

Kinetic Simulation Algorithm Ontology

"To enable the accurate and repeatable execution of a computational simulation task, it is important to identify both the algorithm used and the initial setup. These minimum information requirements are described by the MIASE guidelines. Since the details of some algorithms are not always publicly available, and many are implemented only in a limited number of simulation tools, it is crucial to identify alternative algorithms with similar characteristics that may be used to provide comparable results in an equivalent simulation experiment.

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