astronomy

Harvard Spectral Classification Scheme

"The modern stellar spectral classification scheme (also known as the Harvard Spectral Classification Scheme) was created by Annie Jump Cannon through her examination of spectra from 1918 to 1924. Originally, the scheme used capital letters running alphabetically, but was later reordered to reflect the surface temperatures of stars. In order of decreasing temperature, these types were O, B, A, F, G, K and M. Three additional categories also in the scheme: R, N, and S types, were later realized to represent stars with peculiar heavy-metal abundances.

Unified Astronomy Thesaurus

"The Unified Astronomy Thesaurus (UAT) is an open, interoperable and community-supported thesaurus which unifies the existing divergent and isolated Astronomy & Astrophysics thesauri into a single high-quality, freely-available open thesaurus formalizing astronomical concepts and their inter-relationships. The UAT builds upon the existing IAU Thesaurus with major contributions from the Astronomy portions of the thesauri developed by the Institute of Physics Publishing and the American Institute of Physics.

"The Unified Astronomy Thesaurus (UAT) is an open, interoperable and community-supported thesaurus which unifies the existing divergent and isolated Astronomy & Astrophysics thesauri into a single high-quality, freely-available open thesaurus formalizing astronomical concepts and their inter-relationships. The UAT builds upon the existing IAU Thesaurus with major contributions from the Astronomy portions of the thesauri developed by the Institute of Physics Publishing and the American Institute of Physics.

Solar System SKOS Ontology Model

"This is an ontological knowledge organization system of the planets, dwarf planets, natural satellites, and small solar system bodies in the Solar System using the SKOS, Simple Knowledge Organization System, schema extended. The model defines resources in English, Spanish, Russian, and simplified Chinese. Each resource entry also contains definitions. This facilitates the generation of mono- or multi-lingual glossaries. The concept terms can be used to feed vocabularies to search applications.

Atlas of Stellar Spectra

"The Atlas of Stellar Spectra and the accompanying outline have been prepared from the viewpoint of the practical stellar astronomer. Problems connected with the astrophysical interpretation of the spectral sequence are not touched on; as a consequence, emphasis is placed on ``ordinary'' stars. These are the stars most important statistically and the only ones suitable for large-scale investigations of galactic structure.

"The Atlas of Stellar Spectra and the accompanying outline have been prepared from the viewpoint of the practical stellar astronomer. Problems connected with the astrophysical interpretation of the spectral sequence are not touched on; as a consequence, emphasis is placed on ``ordinary'' stars. These are the stars most important statistically and the only ones suitable for large-scale investigations of galactic structure.

Digital Spectral Classification Atlas

"The MK Spectral classification system was founded by W. W. Morgan and P. C. Keenan in the year 1943, with the publication of the first photographic spectral classification atlas, 'An Atlas of Stellar Spectra' (Morgan, Keenan & Kellman 1943). Since that time, the MK system has been extensively revised and refined by Morgan, Keenan and others. In the late 1970's, two important spectral atlases, summarizing the development of the MK system up until that time, were published.

"The MK Spectral classification system was founded by W. W. Morgan and P. C. Keenan in the year 1943, with the publication of the first photographic spectral classification atlas, 'An Atlas of Stellar Spectra' (Morgan, Keenan & Kellman 1943). Since that time, the MK system has been extensively revised and refined by Morgan, Keenan and others. In the late 1970's, two important spectral atlases, summarizing the development of the MK system up until that time, were published.

Physics and Astronomy Classification Scheme

"The Physics and Astronomy Classification SchemeĀ® (PACS) was developed by the American Institute of Physics (AIP) and has been used in Physical Review since 1975 to identify fields and sub-fields of physics. It is used in a variety of ways, for example, in the online journals as a tool in searching for articles by subject. PACS is arranged hierarchically, by subdivision of the whole spectrum of subject matter in physics- and astronomy-related sciences into segments and then repeating the process of subdivision down to four levels. The latest edition of PACS is the 2010 edition."

"The Physics and Astronomy Classification SchemeĀ® (PACS) was developed by the American Institute of Physics (AIP) and has been used in Physical Review since 1975 to identify fields and sub-fields of physics. It is used in a variety of ways, for example, in the online journals as a tool in searching for articles by subject. PACS is arranged hierarchically, by subdivision of the whole spectrum of subject matter in physics- and astronomy-related sciences into segments and then repeating the process of subdivision down to four levels. The latest edition of PACS is the 2010 edition."