New Zealand

Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification: Socio-Economic Objective

"The Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification (ANZSRC) is jointly produced by the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) and Statistics New Zealand (Statistics NZ). ANZSRC is the collective name for a set of three related classifications developed for use in the measurement and analysis of research and experimental development (R&D) undertaken in Australia and New Zealand. The three constituent classifications included in the ANZSRC are: Type of Activity (TOA), Fields of Research (FOR), and Socio-economic Objective (SEO).

Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification: Fields of Research

"The Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification (ANZSRC) is jointly produced by the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) and Statistics New Zealand (Statistics NZ). ANZSRC is the collective name for a set of three related classifications developed for use in the measurement and analysis of research and experimental development (R&D) undertaken in Australia and New Zealand. The three constituent classifications included in the ANZSRC are: Type of Activity (TOA), Fields of Research (FOR), and Socio-economic Objective (SEO).

Theology in Aotearoa New Zealand: An Annotated Bibliography under Subject Headings

"This annotated bibliography is focused on contextual theology in Aotearoa New Zealand. It is an amended and updated version of an earlier 2002 article: Contextual theology in Aotearoa New Zealand. Asian Christian theologies: a research guide to authors, movements, sources. J. C. England, J. Kuttianimattathil, J. M. Prior et al. Maryknoll, New York, ISPCK/Claretian Publishers/Orbis Books. 1: 541-598."

New Zealand Threat Classification System

"The New Zealand Threat Classification System's long-term goal is to list all extant species that exist here according to their threat of extinction. The system is made up of manuals and corresponding taxa status lists. The status of each species group (birds, plants, reptiles, etc.) is assessed over a 3-year cycle."

Religious Affiliation – New Zealand Standard Classification

"Religious affiliation is a variable of strong interest to religious organisations, social scientists, and can be used as an explanatory variable in studies on topics such as marriage formation and dissolution, fertility and income. In Australia and in Britain, religion is a variable that is used to derive measures of ethnicity. In New Zealand, religious affiliation is of particular significance for data users interested in Māori and in Pacific Island peoples.

New Zealand Soil Classification

"The New Zealand Soil Classification was developed in the 1980s. The top three levels of the classification ( orders, groups, and subgroups) were described by Hewitt (1993) and the fourth level (soilforms) by Clayden and Webb (1994). The new classification grew out of the N ew Zealand Genetic Soil Classification and, where possible, preserved its useful features. The new classification was also influenced by local experience in testing the United States soil classification system "Soil Taxonomy" (Soil Survey Staff 1975, 1996; Leamy et al. 1983).

"The New Zealand Soil Classification was developed in the 1980s. The top three levels of the classification ( orders, groups, and subgroups) were described by Hewitt (1993) and the fourth level (soilforms) by Clayden and Webb (1994). The new classification grew out of the N ew Zealand Genetic Soil Classification and, where possible, preserved its useful features. The new classification was also influenced by local experience in testing the United States soil classification system "Soil Taxonomy" (Soil Survey Staff 1975, 1996; Leamy et al. 1983).

Māori Descent – Standard Classification

"Māori descent is a key variable in meeting the demand for information on the number, distribution and characteristics of the tangata whenua. Māori descent is a flat classification with two categories – excluding residual categories."

"Māori descent is a key variable in meeting the demand for information on the number, distribution and characteristics of the tangata whenua. Māori descent is a flat classification with two categories – excluding residual categories."

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