331 Labor economics

Labour Force Status – Standard Classification

"Labour force status is a key labour market variable. It allows analysis of the employed, unemployed and those persons not in the labour force. Labour force status is derived from the following classifications: job indicator 1, 2 and 3; found work; seeking work; job search methods; available for work.

"""Labour force status is a key labour market variable. It allows analysis of the employed, unemployed and those persons not in the labour force. Labour force status is derived from the following classifications: job indicator 1, 2 and 3; found work; seeking work; job search methods; available for work.

Hours Worked in Employment Per Week – Standard Classification

"The hours worked in employment variable is used to produce information on the nature of employment, the relationship between labour supply and income and to analyse changes in employment characteristics over time. The standard classification of hours worked in employment is a flat classification of hour categories from 1 hour to 168 hours and residual categories."

Multilingual Classification of European Skills, Competences, Qualifications and Occupations

"ESCO identifies and categorises skills/competences, qualifications and occupations relevant for the EU labour market and education and training, in 22 European languages. It provides occupational profiles showing which competences and qualifications are relevant for an occupation. ESCO is developed in an open IT format that can be used by third parties' software. It can be accessed through the ESCO portal and is available free of charge to everyone."

National Occupational Classification

"The National Occupational Classification (NOC) 2011 provides a standardized language for describing the work performed by Canadians in the labour market. It is used for many applications including defining and collecting statistics, managing information databases, analyzing labour market trends and extracting practical career planning information. More importantly, it gives statisticians, labour market analysts, career counsellors, employers and individual job seekers a consistent way to collect data and describe and understand the nature of work.

"The National Occupational Classification (NOC) 2011 provides a standardized language for describing the work performed by Canadians in the labour market. It is used for many applications including defining and collecting statistics, managing information databases, analyzing labour market trends and extracting practical career planning information. More importantly, it gives statisticians, labour market analysts, career counsellors, employers and individual job seekers a consistent way to collect data and describe and understand the nature of work.

Standard Occupational Classification

"The 2010 Standard Occupational Classification (SOC) system is used by Federal statistical agencies to classify workers into occupational categories for the purpose of collecting, calculating, or disseminating data. All workers are classified into one of 840 detailed occupations according to their occupational definition. To facilitate classification, detailed occupations are combined to form 461 broad occupations, 97 minor groups, and 23 major groups. Detailed occupations in the SOC with similar job duties, and in some cases skills, education, and/or training, are grouped together."

EEO-1 Job Classification Guide

"This guide serves as a crosswalk between the 2000 Census job codes and the ten (10) job categories on the Employer Information Report EEO-1, and is designed to assist employers in correctly classifying employees according to the ten (10) job categories on the EEO-1 report. Each job category is explained in the EEO-1 Instruction Booklet with a definition and examples of the types of jobs included in the category."

"This guide serves as a crosswalk between the 2000 Census job codes and the ten (10) job categories on the Employer Information Report EEO-1, and is designed to assist employers in correctly classifying employees according to the ten (10) job categories on the EEO-1 report. Each job category is explained in the EEO-1 Instruction Booklet with a definition and examples of the types of jobs included in the category."

European Socio-economic Classification

"The European Socio-economic Classification (ESeC) is an occupationally based classification but has rules to provide coverage of the whole adult population. The information required to create ESeC is:
* occupation coded to the minor groups (i.e. 3-digit groups) of the International Standard Classification of Occupations 1988 (ISCO88 (COM))
* details of employment status, i.e. whether an employer, self-employed or employee;
* number of employees at the workplace
* whether a worker is a supervisor."

Australian and New Zealand Standard Classification of Occupations

"The Australian and New Zealand Standard Classification of Occupations (ANZSCO) First Edition (cat. no. 1220.0) was released in September 2006. Revision 1 is the first update to ANZSCO First Edition and includes minor changes to the classification structure and definitional changes for some occupations. This product comprises an explanation of the conceptual basis of the classification, the classification structure and definitions for all levels of the classification (major, sub-major, minor and unit groups and occupations).

Position Classification Standards for White Collar Work

"Position classification standards provide information used in determining the occupational series and title for positions performing white collar work in the Federal Government. They also provide grading criteria for positions classified under the General Schedule (GS) Classification System."

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