Pure Science

IUPAC Nomenclature of Organic Chemistry

"Chemical nomenclature is used to identify a chemical species by means of written or spoken words and enables a common language for communication amongst chemists. Nomenclature for chemical compounds additionally contains an explicit or implied relationship to the structure of the compound, in order that the reader or listener can deduce the structure from the name. This purpose requires a system of principles and rules, the application of which gives rise to a systematic nomenclature.

IUPAC Nomenclature of Inorganic Chemistry

"The Rules of Inorganic Nomenclature (the 'Red Book'), first published in 1958 by the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC), were most recently updated as Nomenclature of Inorganic Chemistry 1990. This new 2005 edition of the 'Red Book' clarifies and updates recommendations concerning the names and formulae of inorganic compounds and reflects major recent developments in inorganic chemistry. Moreover, it presents recommendations fully consistent with the principles of the nomenclature of organic chemistry.

IUPAC Compendium of Chemical Terminology

"The Compendium is popularly referred to as the 'Gold Book', in recognition of the contribution of the late Victor Gold, who initiated work on the first edition. It is one of the series of IUPAC 'Colour Books' on chemical nomenclature, terminology, symbols and units (see the list of source documents), and collects together terminology definitions from IUPAC recommendations already published in Pure and Applied Chemistry and in the other Colour Books.

BGS Geoscience Thesaurus

"The BGS Geoscience Thesaurus contains approximately 6000 descriptor terms for concepts in the geoscience and related subjects. Some entries have scope notes to further explain the term. The original source of the data was the Australian Mineral Foundation thesaurus of geoscience; some terms have been added or updated to suit BGS needs and the content will continue to be updated as required. The thesaurus includes synonyms to descriptor terms, hierarchical relationships, symmetric (see also) relationships and lapsed (deprecated) term replacements."

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