Pure Science

Integrated Taxonomic Information System

"ITIS is an easily accessible database with reliable information on species names and their hierarchical classification that is publicly accessible with unlimited free use. The database is reviewed periodically to ensure high quality with valid classifications, revisions, and additions of newly described species. The ITIS includes documented taxonomic information of flora and fauna from both aquatic and terrestrial habitats.

Star Trek Spectral Classification

"Stars can generally be classified by their color. A purple star is always Class O, a yellow star is always Class G. However, there can be vast differences within each class. Most Class M stars are tiny and don't emit much light... however, many K- and G-type stars can evolve into red giants. That makes them Class M, but they are NOTHING like the tiny stars that make up the vast majority of Class M stars. Since most stars spend most of their lives on the Main Sequence, the descriptions on this page can be applied to the majority of stars.

Star Trek Nebula Classification

"A nebula is an interstellar cloud of dust, gas, and plasma, where star formation usually occurs. In the year 2400, the Federation introduced a new system to classify nebulae. The new system first assigns the nebula a letter designation based upon its general composition. If the nebula has any unusual quirks, it is assigned an additional number designation. For example, a Class F2 Nebula is a Dark Nebula that contains disruptive electromagnetic radiation."

Star Trek Planetary Classification

"A planet is a celestial body in orbit around a star or stellar remnants, that has sufficient mass for self-gravity and is nearly spherical in shape. A planet must not share its orbital region with other bodies of significant size (except for its own satellites), and must be below the threshold for thermonuclear fusion of
deuterium. If a celestial body meets those requirements, it is considered a planet; at that point, the planet is further classified by its atmosphere and surface conditions into one of twenty-two categories."

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